List of Browsers available on Linux - Linux Tutorials - Learn Linux Configuration

Users of Linux systems have many choices when it comes to web browsers, as there is a wide range that can be installed. You may already have a favorite browser or you may be still deciding which browser is right for you. In this tutorial, we have compiled a list of browsers that are available on Linux, and will show you how to install them on all major Linux distros.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Introduction to different web browsers that are available for Linux
  • How to install various web browsers on all major Linux distros
List of Browsers available on Linux Software Requirements and Linux Command Line Conventions Category Requirements, Conventions or Software Version Used System Any Linux distro Software Mozilla Firefox, Chromium, Google Chrome, Brave, Opera, SeaMonkey, Vivaldi, Tor, LYNX, Microsoft Edge Other Privileged access to your Linux system as root or via the sudo command. Conventions # – requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command $ – requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

List of Browsers available on Linux

  1. Mozilla Firefox

    Firefox is included as the default browser on most Linux distributions. It is always a safe choice if you are looking for a web browser to start using.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu:
    $ sudo snap install firefox
    
    Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ sudo apt install firefox
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install firefox
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S firefox
    
  2. Chromium

    Essentially, Chromium is just Google Chrome without the extra stuff (mostly proprietary and closed source) that was added by Google. It’s open source and even included as the default browser on some distros.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ sudo apt install chromium-browser
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install chromium
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S chromium
    
  3. Google Chrome

    Google Chrome is closed source and therefore usually a bit tricky to install on some distros, since it isn’t included in the default repos. However, it remains the most popular web browser in the world.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ wget https://dl.google.com/linux/direct/google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb
    $ sudo apt install ./google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ wget https://dl.google.com/linux/direct/google-chrome-stable_current_x86_64.rpm
    $ sudo dnf localinstall ./google-chrome-stable_current_x86_64.rpm
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro (from AUR):
    $ git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/google-chrome.git
    $ cd google-chrome/
    $ makepkg -s
    $ sudo pacman -U --noconfirm google-chrome-*.xz
    
  4. Brave

    Brave is based on Chromium and has a high focus on user privacy. It automatically blocks embedded ads and tracking cookies.

    Installation Instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ sudo apt install apt-transport-https curl
    $ sudo curl -fsSLo /usr/share/keyrings/brave-browser-archive-keyring.gpg https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/brave-browser-archive-keyring.gpg
    $ echo "deb [signed-by=/usr/share/keyrings/brave-browser-archive-keyring.gpg arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main"|sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list
    $ sudo apt update
    $ sudo apt install brave-browser
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install dnf-plugins-core
    $ sudo dnf config-manager --add-repo https://brave-browser-rpm-release.s3.brave.com/x86_64/
    $ sudo rpm --import https://brave-browser-rpm-release.s3.brave.com/brave-core.asc
    $ sudo dnf install brave-browser
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S brave-browser
    
  5. Opera

    Opera is a web browser based on the Chromium project. While not as popular as Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome, it has been around a lot longer than both of them and offers a great web browsing experience with its sleek user interface.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ wget -qO- https://deb.opera.com/archive.key | sudo apt-key add -
    $ sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=i386,amd64] https://deb.opera.com/opera-stable/ stable non-free"
    $ sudo apt update
    $ sudo apt install opera-stable
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo rpm --import https://rpm.opera.com/rpmrepo.key
    $ sudo tee /etc/yum.repos.d/opera.repo <<RPMREPO
    [opera]
    name=Opera packages
    type=rpm-md
    baseurl=https://rpm.opera.com/rpm
    gpgcheck=1
    gpgkey=https://rpm.opera.com/rpmrepo.key
    enabled=1
    RPMREPO
    $ sudo dnf install opera-stable
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S opera
    

  6. SeaMonkey

    SeaMonkey shares a lot of the same code as Mozilla Firefox, therefore offers a similar browsing experience. It also comes with a suite of other applications, like an email client.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ echo -e "\ndeb http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/ubuntuzilla/mozilla/apt all main" | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list > /dev/null
    $ sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com 2667CA5C
    $ sudo apt update
    $ sudo apt install seamonkey-mozilla-build
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install seamonkey
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S seamonkey
    
  7. Vivaldi

    Vivaldi is based on Chromium but adds many of its own proprietary features. It was founded by the former Opera co-founder and is largely a response to the direction Opera has turned to in recent years.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    First, download from Vivaldi.com
    $ sudo apt install ./vivaldi-*.deb
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    First, download from Vivaldi.com
    $ sudo dnf localinstall ./vivaldi-*.rpm
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S vivaldi
    
  8. Tor

    For anyone looking to protect their privacy online, Tor is an invaluable tool. Tor works by routing your computer’s internet traffic through their own network. This way, you can still access online resources as usual, but your network traffic appears to originate from the Tor network, your IP address remains hidden, and your data is encrypted in the process. With Tor, you can also access .onion domain names, and access the infamous dark web.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ sudo apt install tor
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install tor
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S tor
    
  9. Lynx

    Lynx is a text based web browser. While not practical to use as your principal web browser, it does work well whenever you need to pull up a website from the command line terminal. For example, on a server that does not have a GUI installed.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    $ sudo apt install lynx
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    $ sudo dnf install lynx
    
    Arch Linux and Manjaro:
    $ sudo pacman -S lynx
    
  10. Microsoft Edge

    Many would think it an odd choice to use a Mircrosoft’s flagship web browser on Linux. But, maybe some developers would want it in order to test compatibility with some website they are working on.

    Installation instructions:

    Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint:
    First, download Edge from Microsoft.com
    $ sudo apt install ./microsoft-edge-*.deb
    
    Fedora, Red Hat, AlmaLinux, Centos:
    First, download Edge from Microsoft.com
    $ sudo dnf localinstall ./microsoft-edge-*.rpm
    

Closing Thoughts

In this tutorial, we saw a list of browsers available for Linux, as well as instructions on how to install various web browsers on a Linux system. There are definitely a lot of choices available, so Linux users can get exactly what they want in their web browser. If you think we missed one, feel free to leave it in the comments below.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://linuxconfig.org/list-of-browsers-available-on-linux

I use Waterfox, or course you have to download the tar file and install it yourself. Still the lack of telemetry is worth that to me.