Recover data after adding a dual-boot


#21

And… Part 2


#22

I’m sorry I misunderstood what you were asking.

Tom Markham


#23

Hi Tomm,

No problem, we got the info we needed. Next let’s see what is available to boot by executing:

$ efibootmgr

Assuming you’ve got UEFI system.


#24

Oh no! “EFI variables are not supported on this system.”


#25

Oh no! “EFI variables are not supported on this system.”

Now what?


#26

Now we will check your grub menu items.
Please execute the following as normal user:

$ awk -F’ ‘/menuentry / {print $2}’ /boot/grub/grub.cfg

And paste the results here.


#27

got this:

awk


#28

Hi Tomm,

Sorry, typo on my part, my last post missed a backslash. Let’s try again with the correct command:

$ awk -F\’ ‘/menuentry / {print $2}’ /boot/grub/grub.cfg


#30

Now I got this:

awk3

copy/paste did not work for me on that previous attempt


#31

Hi Tomm,

Sadly this doesn’t look like a dual-boot grub. How did you performed the dual-boot setup? You’ve set the Ubuntu installer to dual-boot?


#32

I youtubed “how to set up Ubuntu to dual-boot with another linux program.”
I must have missed a step.

Thank you sincerely for trying so adamantly, Sandman.

Tom Markham


#33

Hi Tomm,

One more thing: is your hard drive the size displayed in the output of fdisk utility, around 220 GB?


#34

1- I’ve been out of communication for almost 2 weeks, so I haven’t been ignoring you.

  2- If my hard drive is not 220 G, how do I find out? I thought the report I sent was a FULL report. Does Linux/Ubuntu allow a part of the drive to be hidden?

#35

Hi Tomm,

Let’s see the parted output, just to be sure:

sudo parted /dev/sda print


#36

MyPartitions


#37

Hi Tomm,

This indeed looks like you have a disk of the size of 240GB, which is filled with the new Ubuntu partitions. Which means that your previous data is wiped.
A backup would save you now…


#38

Thank you very much. I’m busy switching from U to Mint, and installing “Back in Time”